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Understanding NoteFrog - An Overview
A Birdseye View of the Frog.
  • You create and collect free-form, unstructured notes.
  • NoteFrog saves your notes into "Stacks" which are logically just like stacks of paper notes on your desk.
  • You can then search through your stacks instantly by typing any character strings that you are looking for and NoteFrog performs a dynamic search showing you all notes that contain your search string as you type.
  • Notes, Items, Stacks and the Library
    We will refer to the content of the stacks as being "items" because although the items are generally text "notes" they may also be images.

    Your items go into stacks and stacks go into a Library. Shown below is a representation of a Library containing four stacks: three stacks of user items plus the NoteFrog Trash Stack. The number of stacks and the number of items within a stack are limited only by your hardware.

    Except fot the Trash Stack, you may name stacks as you wish. In this example the user has named his stacks Personal, DayLog, and Business, they contain 850, 312 and 632 items respectively, and the Trash Stack contains 31 items. Notefrog maintains a trash stack of deleted items that may be recovered up until the time the user specifically empties the trash.

    A NoteFrog Stack Library (The Library) with 3 User Stacks
    User
    Stack
    Personal

    850 Items

    User
    Stack
    Day Log

    312 Items

    User
    Stack
    Business

    632 Items

    System
    Trash
    Stack
    31 Items
    NOTE NoteFrog Standard Edition has a single user stack plus the trash stack.
    Inside a Stack and the "Active Stack"
    User Stack
    Personal
    Note
    Note
    .
    .
    .
    Image
    .
    .
    .
    Note
    .
    .
    (850 Items)
    Each Stack is made up of any number of items-- a "Stack of Notes" as it were. The newest Items and those most recently edited/changed are placed at the top of the stack. Only one Stack is open at a time and the open stack is referred to as the "Active Stack". The items in the stack may be text notes or images. The Text items are completely free-form and unstructured and may be created and modified by typing them in or pasting from the Windows clipboard or any combination. New notes may be created using "Create" buttons on the main program panel. Notes may be edited, copied to alternate stacks, and deleted.
    TIP URL's contained within notes are clickable and will open in a new browser window.
    Continue The Quick Introduction
    Next Topic: Creating Notes